Russians Protest Invasion Of Ukraine Despite Crackdowns On Dissent

Russian celebrities — including athletes, actors, and Eurovision stars — have also publicly denied the invasion, putting their careers at great risk due to the government’s heavy influence in the entertainment industry. In an Instagram video, popular singer Valery Meladze pleaded for an end to the invasion.

“History will be the judge of these events,” Meladze said. “But today, I bag you, please stop the war.”

On Wednesday, just before the invasion began, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky made a televised speech calling for peace and highlighting the close ties between Russia and Ukraine.

“This is our land. This is our history. What are you fighting for and with whom?” Zelensky said. “Many of you have been to Ukraine. Many of you have relatives in Ukraine. Some have studied in Ukrainian universities. Some have made friends with Ukrainians. You know our characters. You know our people. You know our principles.”

Zelensky also directly addressed the people of Russia, urging them to stand with Ukraine and let their own government know they don’t want war.

“I know that my address to you won’t be shown on Russian television, but the citizens of Russia should see it. They should know the truth, and the truth is that this needs to stop before it’s too late,” he said. “And if the leadership of Russia doesn’t want to sit down at the table with us for the sake of peace, maybe they will sit down at the table with you. Do Russians want war? I

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This Haitian Town Hopes To Become A Surfing Destination

The trouble began in July 2018 in the capital city of Port-au-Prince, 54 miles north.

The government had just announced a 50% increase in fuel prices following an agreement with the International Monetary Fund, eliciting protests that turned violent, with demonstrators looting stores and police firing tear gas. The protesters called for accountability, most notably regarding the whereabouts of $2 billion from PetroCaribe, an oil deal with Venezuela that was meant to help Haiti invest in infrastructure and social programs.

Economic growth was grinding to a halt and inflation was soaring. The question on everyone’s mind: What did Haiti have to show for the $13 billion from the world, thousands of volunteers, and countless projects?

Tourists were barely coming to Haiti — and many Haitians were leaving, including Gilles, who moved to the Dominican Republic in December 2019 for two years so he could find a job and save some money. Today, he’s trying to set up a small shop selling snacks and drinks on the Haiti–Dominican Republic border. Though he longed to stay in southern Haiti, he said, “I really want a job and to feel independent.”

Around half a dozen of Surf Haiti’s founders and older members were among those who left, most of them to the US, after getting into college or finding jobs.

When boards began breaking, there wasn’t anyone to bring new ones. Wax became scarce. Visitors slowed to a trickle, and the kids who had waited by the shore for Pierce to paddle back

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Facebook Spanish Language Moderators Say They’re Treated Worse Than English Counterparts

At the Richardson, Texas, office of Genpact, a Meta subcontractor, Spanish-language moderators told BuzzFeed News they’ve been required to report to the office since April 2021, despite the emergence of both Delta and Omicron variants that caused COVID infections to spike across the US. Throughout this time, they said, moderators reviewing English-language content have been allowed to cycle through the office in three-month rotations.

“Being in the office … has been nothing short of a nightmare,” one moderator said.

BuzzFeed News spoke to three members of Genpact’s so-called Mexican market team who described a pattern of inequitable treatment of Spanish-language moderators. All of these individuals spoke on the condition of anonymity as Genpact requires them to sign nondisclosure agreements and they feared for their jobs. They said that in addition to reporting to the office for the last nine months while their English-language counterparts could work from home, Spanish-language moderators are held to unrealistic performance standards and are not compensated for working in two languages, which they say is more time-consuming. In addition, they face the pressures of managing a Facebook market that has long been criticized as under-moderated amid the threat of active COVID cases.

Genpact spokesperson Danielle D’Angelo declined to comment on all of the specific claims made by Spanish-language moderators, including the claim that its Mexican market team was not allowed to work from home while other teams were rotated out.

“We would like to stress that employee safety is our top priority and that has and

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